Business

Gol reports BRL 658 million in gross sales in June

The Brazilian airline said it operates with a flexible model that allows a gradual resumption

Gol's airplane
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  • Unit passenger revenue (Prask in the sector’s acronym) for the second quarter tends to be just 5% lower compared to the same period last year, according to the company.
  • The company reports that it closed collective agreements, with reduced working hours and other alternatives, but with guaranteed job stability, with 8,600 ground workers and 5,000 crew members;

Gol released its monthly preliminary results report for June this Thursday. In it, the airline says it closed the last month with BRL 658 million in gross sales. Gol operated 120 daily flights in June, with an occupancy rate of 77%.

In a statement to the market, the president of Gol, Paulo Kakinoff, said that the company’s model allows for a gradual resumption. “As passenger demand resumes, our flexible low-cost business model enables us to quickly reopen routes where needed,” said Kakinoff. “We are confident that we are in a strong position as Brazil’s biggest domestic airline to meet this demand and, as a result, that we can increase our market share in the recovery.”

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The unit passenger revenue (Prask in the sector’s acronym) for the second quarter tends to be just 5% lower compared to the same period last year, according to the company.

The company reports that it closed collective agreements, with reduced working hours and other alternatives, but with guaranteed job stability, with 8,600 ground workers and 5,000 crew members.

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Gol also said it plans to return seven planes Boeing 737-800 in the second half of the year (in the first half of 2020 the airline had already reduced its fleet by 11 planes).

The company stressed that it can reduce its fleet by another 30 planes in the next two years, if necessary because it operates with flexible contracts, which allow the planes devolution in case of low activity.